U.S. Soccer Wants YOU To Fund Its Youth National Teams

I guess all those lawyer fees add up.

U.S. Soccer really knows how to piss off its fanbase. Whether it’s repeatedly denying equal pay requests from USWNT players or failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup, it speaks to the beauty of the beautiful game that Americans still support their national teams as fervently as they do. 

But that’s not going to stop U.S. soccer fans from putting the federation on blast for an odd fundraising push. The USMNT posted an article on Twitter asking for donations for the youth national teams on Wednesday. The responses were both hilarious and predictable.

U.S. Soccer, which reports assets annually in the hundreds of millions, is asking for fans to donate to the youth national teams. If you follow the links, the suggested donation is $50, though the selectable amounts range from $25-200. You’re even given the option to make these payments on a monthly or annual basis, but at least that’s not the default choice like the GOP does for donations. 

I don’t think anyone is saying youth national team players aren’t deserving of having the resources needed to be successful, but it wasn’t surprising to see fans’ reactions.

The USSF is a non-profit aimed at making soccer the most popular sport in the country. The USMNT and USWNT are just two of 24 teams under its purview. But it’s by no means lacking in resources, though not all have been spent wisely. 

USSF Youth Soccer

In 2020, U.S. Soccer reported $168.6 million in assets, with $135.4 million in revenue and $165.0 million in expenses, including $19 million for legal fees. I’m no financial expert, but any entity spending that much on legal fees should probably rethink its priorities instead of asking individuals to fund youth soccer.

Twitter users were quick to point out youth soccer shouldn’t be a Kickstarter, noting money spent on legal fees and exorbitant prices charged for match tickets. 

What do you think: Should U.S. Soccer be begging for donations to fund its youth national teams or should it figure out a way to fund all of its teams?

Videos you might like