Science

Expert Nutritionists Provide 3 Easy Tips To Help You Navigate The Holiday Season

A holiday season done right celebrates the greatest aspects of family, food and relaxation, but we all know that an excess of any of those three things can negatively impact our mind and body (sorry Aunt Linda!). 

It’s important to keep things in perspective. Your health or diet isn’t going to be completely sabotaged by one meal or even a handful of meals throughout the holiday season, and there’s no reason you can’t enjoy your favorite foods to mark these special occasions; the key is to find a balance that allows you to feel good afterward. 

Robot Camera Ruins Soccer Match

A robot camera just ruined a soccer match in Scotland. The camera uses artificial intelligence to track the soccer ball throughout the match. But in a recent fixture between Inverness Caledonian Thistle and Ayr United the camera kept getting confused by the linesman's bald head. Since fans were not allowed in the stadium the only way to watch the match was the televised broadcast. However, for a good chunk of the time, all the viewers could watch was the linesman running up and down the sideline. The home club (Thistle) recently switched from human camera operators to the new A.I.

Forgotten Genius: How Sam Allardyce's Tenure At Bolton Helped Transform Modern Football

"He was what I called a ball-playing defender," long-time friend Dave Bassett said of Sam Allardyce, "If he wasn't playing with the ball he was playing with your balls."

Allardyce was a feared center back during his 20-plus years in English football due to his propensity to clatter opposing strikers and leave them moaning in pain on the turf. He was even given the nickname "Super Sam Bionic Man" for his ability to quickly ascend from these tackles and continue playing. 

Footballers Could Actually Be At Greater Risk Of COVID-19, New Research Suggests

MANCHESTER, England — Research from Germany and Italy suggests that footballers and other athletes face a particular risk of the coronavirus infecting their lungs, raising major questions over attempts to restart professional soccer.

The research, produced by Italian immunologists and lung specialists based at institutes in Berlin, Rome and Verona, suggests that due to strenuous exercise, elite athletes are more likely to inhale virus particles and direct them to the lower areas of the lung.

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