The Greatest Men's World Cup Records Of All Time

From most goals to fastest red card, we’ve compiled all of the greatest World Cup records of all time.

The greatest tournament in the greatest sport generates the greatest records. The FIFA World Cup, which dates back to 1930, has no shortage of incredible records. With the 2018 tournament around the corner, we’ve compiled the greatest World Cup records of all time.

Want to know who has scored the most goals in the World Cup, overall, in a single match or a single tournament? Read on. 

Want to know who has the most clean sheets or longest scoreless streak in a World Cup? Read on.

Want to know who got the fastest red card or the guy who actually got three yellow cards? Read on.

Want to know everything about the World Cup final? Click here.

We’ve divided the World Cup records into three categories: greatest World Cup records, individual records, team records and coaching records. Read on.

Greatest World Cup Records

Most Goals By Individual

16 — Miroslav Klose, Germany (2002-2014)

Klose achieved the feat over four World Cups. 

Most Goals By An Individual In Single World Cup

13 — Just Fontaine, France (1958)

Fontaine, who was born in Marrakech, scored 30 goals in 21 appearances for Les Bleus

World Cup Records

Will Just Fontaine’s World Cup record ever be broken? Photo: @fifaworldcup_es | Twitter

Most Goals By A Team In Single World Cup

27 — Hungary (1954)

The Mighty Magyars lost 3-2 to West Germany in the final after beating the same team 8-3 in the group stage. They also won 9-0 over South Korea, which set a record for most goals conceded (16) in a single tournament. Hungary also set the mark for highest goal difference (+17). 

Most Clean Sheets By Goalkeeper

10 — Peter Shilton, England (1982-1990), Fabien Barthez, France (1998-2006)

Barthez won a World Cup while Shilton allowed the Hand of God goal to Diego Maradona. 

Most Goals Scored In Single Match

5 — Oleg Salenko, Russia (1994)

The Russians won 6-1 over Cameroon in a meaningless group-stage match in California. 

Most Goals Conceded In Single Match

10 — Luis Guevara Mora, El Salvador (1982)

Hungary opened its World Cup with a 10-1 win over an El Salvador team that qualified over the U.S. That year, El Salvador took 20 players to the tournament, two fewer than allowed as a cost-cutting measure. 

Most Total Goals In Single Match

12 — Austria 7-5 Switzerland (1954)

Austria trailed 3-0 before coming back to win. The 1954 tournament still holds the record for most goals per match (5.38).

Fastest Hat Trick

8 minutes — László Kiss, Hungary (1982)

Kiss scored in the 69th, 72nd and 76th minutes against El Salvador. 

Most Penalties Missed

2 — Asamoah Gyan, Ghana

Gyan missed one against the Czech Republic in 2006 and another in the quarterfinals against Uruguay in 2010. 

Fastest Goal From Kickoff

10.8 seconds — Hakan Şükür, Turkey (2002)

The goal came against South Korea in the third-place match despite South Korea kicking off.

Fastest Red Card

56 seconds — José Batista, Uruguay (1986)

Batista made a rash challenge on Scotland’s Gordon Strachan but La Celeste held on for a 0-0 draw to reach the knockout rounds. 

Fastest Yellow Card

13 seconds — Jesús Gallardo, Mexico (2018)

Gallardo jumped into a Swedish player almost immediately to be booked.

Most Cards

— Javier Mascherano, Argentina (2006-2018)

After Mascherano's mark with seven yellows, France's Zinedine Zidane, Brazil's Cafu and Mexico's Rafael Márquez are tied with six. Zidane and Cafu faced off in the 1998 final and the 2006 quarterfinals, Zidane winning both times.

Most Red Cards

2 — Zinedine Zidane, France (1998, 2006); Rigobert Song, Cameroon (1994-98)

Who can forget Zidane's exit in the 2006 World Cup final? 

Most Yellow Cards In Match (Single Player)

3 — Josip Šimunić, Croatia (2006)

English referee Graham Poll will go down in infamy as the only idiot to give out three yellow cards to a single player, only sending Šimunić off after his third yellow in the 93rd minute. 

Most Cards In Match

16 — Portugal vs. Netherlands (2006), Cameroon vs. Germany (2002)

Known as the Battle of Nuremberg, Portugal received a record nine cards in 2006, a mark matched by the Netherlands against Spain in the 2010 final. 

Most Championships (Team)

5 — Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)

Italy and Germany are second with four apiece.

Most Championships (Individual)

3 — Pelé (1958, 1962, 1970)

Pelé only played in the first two matches of the 1962 tournament but won a medal retroactively in 2007. Only five non-Brazilians have won two World Cups. 

World Cup Records

Pelé has the most important of all World Cup records. Photo: @brfootball | Twitter

Most Common Matchup

7 — Brazil vs. Sweden, Germany vs. Yugoslavia/Serbia, Argentina vs. Germany

Brazil and Sweden haven’t met in the World Cup since 1994. 

Most Common Final

3 — Germany vs. Argentina

Including the 2014 final won by Die Mannschaft, the Argentines and West Germans split the 1986 and 1990 World Cup finals.

Most Nations Coached

5 — Bora Milutinović and Carlos Alberto Parreira

Milutinović coached Mexico in 1986, Costa Rica in 1990, the U.S. in 1994, Nigeria in 1998 and China in 2002. Parreira coached Kuwait in 1982, UAE in 1990, Brazil in 1994 and 2006, Saudi Arabia in 1998 and South Africa in 2010.

Highest Attendance

199,854 — Brazil vs. Uruguay (1950)

The deciding match of the 1950 World Cup broke the hearts of tens of thousands of Brazilians as Uruguay won 2-1 at the Maracanã.

Lowest Attendance

300 — Romania vs. Peru (1930)

The official attendance was 2,459 but it was far lower than that for the opening match of Group 3. 

Individual World Cup Records

Longest Scoreless Streak By Goalkeeper

517 minutes — Walter Zenga, Italy (1990)

Zenga recorded five straight clean sheets in this span. 

Most Goals Conceded By Goalkeeper

25 — Antonio Carbajal, Mexico; Mohamed Al-Deayaa, Saudi Arabia

To be fair to Carbajal, he appeared in a record five tournaments. 

Most Penalties Saved

2 — Jan Tomaszewski, Poland; Brad Friedel, U.S., Iker Casillas, Spain

Tomaszewski (1974) and Friedel (2002) accomplished the feat in a single tournament.

Most Matches Won

17 — Miroslav Klose, Germany (2002-2014)

Klose also appeared in a record 14 knockout-round matches. 

Most Tournaments Played

5 — Antonio Carbajal, Mexico (1950-1966), Lothar Matthäus, Germany (1982-1998), Rafael Márquez (2002-2018)

Gianluigi Buffon also went to five World Cups, but did not play in 1998. 

Most Matches Played

25 — Lothar Matthäus, Germany (1982-1998)

The iconic German won the first FIFA World Player of the Year in 1991, still the only German to win the award. 

Most Matches Played As Captain

17 — Rafael Márquez, Mexico (2002-2018)

Second most is Diego Maradona, who led La Albiceleste to the finals in 1986 and 1990, winning it all in 1986 in Mexico.

Most Tournaments As Captain

5 — Rafael Márquez, Mexico (2002-2018)

He came on as a sub twice in the group stage in 2018 to add to his mark and started against Brazil in the Round of 16.

World Cup Records

Rafael Márquez holds multiple World Cup records, both good and bad. Photo: @drewwwm | Twitter

Most Minutes Played

2,217 — Paolo Maldini, Italy (1990-2002)

The AC Milan legend won five Champions League titles but never won the World Cup.

Youngest Player

17 years, 41 days — Norman Whiteside, Northern Ireland (1982)

At the time, Whiteside had made just two of his eventual 206 appearances for Manchester United. 

World Cup Records

Just a wee lad. Photo: @YesWeCrann | Twitter

Youngest Captain

21 days, 109 days — Tony Meola, United States (1990)

The U.S. didn’t exactly have much experience to call upon in its first World Cup since 1950.

Oldest Player

45 years, 161 days — Essam El-Hadary, Egypt (2018)

Not surprisingly, he’s a goalie. He passed Colombia goalkeeper Faryd Mondragón, who was 43 years and three days old at the 2014 World Cup. 

Oldest Captain

40 years, 292 days — Peter Shilton, England (1990)

Shilton still owns the record for most England caps (125) and used to hold the record for most competitive appearances with 1,249.

First World Cup Goal

Lucien Laurent, France (1930)

Laurent beat Bart McGhee of the United States by four minutes. 

Youngest Goal Scorer

17 years, 7 months, 27 days— Pelé, Brazil (1958)

Pelé’s first of 12 goals came against Wales. 

Oldest Goal Scorer

42 years, 1 month, 8 days — Roger Milla, Cameroon (1994)

After electrifying fans with four goals in 1990, Milla added one more in 1994 against Russia. And if the music from the video below doesn’t get you excited for soccer, we don’t know what will.

Team World Cup Records

Most Wins

73 — Brazil

Germany is second with 67 while Italy is third with 45, far fewer despite having also won four tournaments.

Most Losses

27 — Mexico

Argentina (23) and Germany (22) are the only other countries with 20 or more World Cup losses.

Most Draws

21 — Italy, England

Germany has 20. 

Most Matches

109 — Brazil, Germany

The World Cup's two most successful teams share the record for most matches played at the World Cup. 

Most Wins In Single Tournament

7 — Brazil (2002)

Still the only team to go 7-0 in a single World Cup.

Most Goals Scored

229 — Brazil

Brazil passed Germany (226) during the 2018 tournament even though three of the top six all-time World Cup goal scorers are German.

Fewest Goals Scored (With At Least One Appearance)

0 — Canada, China, Indonesia (as Dutch East Indies in 1938), Trinidad and Tobago, DR Congo (as Zaire in 1974).

None of these nations will get off this list in 2018. 

Fewest Goals Scored By World Cup Champion

8 — Spain (2010)

For all their attacking wizardry, La Furia Roja won their only World Cup with defense.

Most Goals Conceded

125 — Germany

Brazil is second with 105 goals allowed followed by Mexico (98) and Argentina (93). 

World Cup Records

Oliver Kahn and Germany conceded twice in the 2002 final. Photo: @botdelmundial | Twitter

Fewest Goals Conceded (With At Least One Appearance)

2 — Angola

Angola had two draws and one loss at the 2006 World Cup, it’s only appearance. From 1930-1974, players from Angola participated as part of Portugal. 

Fewest Goals Conceded By World Cup Champion

2 — France (1998), Italy (2006), Spain (2010)

Cliché alert: Defense wins championships.

Most Consecutive Minutes Without Conceding

554 — Switzerland (1994, 2006-2010)

Prior to this streak, the Swiss set the record for most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal at 22.

Most Own Goals Conceded

4 — Mexico

Bulgaria (1966) and Russia (2018) are the only teams to have conceded multiple own goals in the same tournament.

Best Goal Differential

+124 — Brazil

After Germany (101), the next best goal differential is Italy with +51.

Worst Goal Differential

-38 — Mexico

Despite playing in the same group, Mexico overtook South Korea (-36) at the 2018 tournament. They are followed by Bulgaria (-31) and the U.S./Cameroon (-25).

Most Penalty Shootouts

5 — Argentina

La Albiceleste are 4-1 in shootouts.

Most Penalty Shootouts Won

4 — Germany, Argentina

Die Mannschaft have never lost a shootout and gave Argentina its only loss (in 2006). 

Most Penalty Shootouts Lost

3 — England, Italy

The Azzurri haven’t lost a World Cup shootout since Gianluigi Buffon took over the No. 1 role.

Most Red Cards

11 — Brazil

Joga bonito?

Most Finals Appearances

8 — Germany (1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990 as West Germany, 2002, 2014 as Germany)

Brazil is 5-1 in finals compared to Germany’s 4-4 mark, though Brazil also has a second runners-up finish in 1950 when there was no official final match. 

Most Top-Four Finishes

13 — Germany (1934, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990 as West Germany, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 as Germany)

Brazil is second with 11 but has never finished outside the top 16 in 20 editions. 

Most 5th-8th-Place Finishes

8 — England (1950, 1954, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2006)

A very England statistic.

Most 9th-16th-Place Finishes

14 — Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)

Not really a record El Tri fans want to see.

Most Tournaments Unbeaten

7 — Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 2002)

Looks like the Seleção are due for another unbeaten run.

Most Tournaments Eliminated Without Having Lost

3 — England (1982, 1990, 2006)

England always finds a way to flame out of World Cups in the most devastating fashions.

Most Tournaments Eliminated Without Having Won

6 — Mexico, Bulgaria

Mexico hasn’t finished a World Cup without a win since 1978. 

Most Consecutive Appearances

21 — Brazil (all of ’em)

Including the 2018 World Cup, Brazil is the only team to have appeared at every tournament. 

Longest Gap Between Titles

44 years — Italy (1938-1982)

The Azzurri won two of the first three tournaments but didn’t win again until the 80s.

Longest Gap Between Tournament Appearances

56 years — Egypt (1934-1990), Norway (1938-1994)

These records were aided by 12 years of no World Cups because of World War II.

Most Appearances In Top Three Without Winning

4 — Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010, 2014)

The Oranje have been in three finals without ever claiming a world title.

Most Appearances Without Advancing Past First Round

8 — Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998) 

The Scots haven’t been to a World Cup since 1998.

Most Consecutive Failed Qualification Attempts

20 — Luxembourg (1934-2018)

One of these days... Actually, no. Not until FIFA increases the number of teams to more than 100.

Most Times Hosted

2 — Italy, France, Brazil, Mexico, Germany

Mexico will become the first three-time host as part of the united bid with the U.S. and Canada.

World Cup Records

The Azteca has hosted multiple World Cups. Photo: @AntiqueFootball | Twitter

Coaching World Cup Records

Most Matches Coached

25 — Helmut Schön, West Germany (1966-1978)

Can you imagine a coach lasting four World Cups in today’s coaching climate?

World Cup Records

Helmut Schön owns two World Cup records. Photo: @FIFAcom | Twitter

Most Matches Won

16 — Helmut Schön, West Germany (1966-1978)

West Germany won it all in 1974. 

Youngest Coach

27 years, 267 days — Juan José Tramutola, Argentina (1930)

La Albiceleste finished second that year, the first edition of the World Cup. 

Oldest Coach

71 years, 317 days — Otto Rehhagel, Greece (2010)

Greece won one and lost two and went out in the group stage. 

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